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The Connection Between Social Media and Cosmetic Surgery

5853275494 b38e1e85e7_nWe’ve all been a little embarrassed after a friend tags us in a rather unflattering photo on Facebook, but would a little embarrassment ever prompt you to consider cosmetic surgery? For some people, the answer is a resounding yes.

Social media has become one of our primary forms of communication, especially with people we don’t get to see on a regular basis (think ex-boyfriends, high school friends, etc.). Platforms like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn center on photographs and a handful of unflattering photos can take a toll on our self-image.

Dr. Mandell-Brown, a Cincinnati cosmetic surgeon admits that he’s seen an increase in procedures directly related to unflattering photos appearing on various social media outlets.

"All of us want to look our best," Mandell-Brown said. "We're finding people who are single, who are looking for jobs. They're using LinkedIn, they're using some of their Facebook and other social media avenues to seek friends or seek positions, re-contact old friends from high school and they want to present their best possible image."

Even during a recession, people are still willing to invest in their looks.

"Even though they might tighten the budget, they'll spend money maybe on Botox or on little things such as soft tissue fillers or facial peels," said Mandell-Brown. "We're seeing an increase in those procedures compared to the more expensive tummy tucks, breast lifts, breast augmentation, mommy makeovers, because it's more affordable for some of these procedural cosmetic things that can be performed. But in our practice, we've been very fortunate - and each year we see just a little percentage increase and it may be partly the social media."

As of 2012, Facebook alone accounts for estimated 845 million active users and 250 million photos are uploaded by users on a daily basis. The pressure to go under the knife (or needle) doesn’t appear to be going anywhere soon. Only time will tell how social media will affect the cosmetic enhancement industry.

Source: ABC News

Photo Credit: christoph_aigner

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